Sussex-Coast-College-Hate-Crime-workshop-300x225

Sussex Youth Commission (SYC) members Lakeisha Kayoka, 21, and Mageed Gharib, 22, were joined by Peter Allan, Hate Crime Sergeant for Sussex Police at Sussex Coast College Hastings, for an interactive workshop on hate crime.

The event was part of the Police & Crime Commissioner’s Youth Commission’s Sussex-wide consultation called the ‘Big Conversation’. Around 20 students and several members of staff got involved and were forthcoming about their own distressing experiences of hate crime.

Youth Commission member, Mageed, said: “As a Muslim living in Brighton I have personally witnessed and experienced hate crime on a daily basis. I feel that this is especially bad due to Brighton’s great diversity of religions, cultures, and sexual orientations. Being able to hold a workshop to address some of the issues around lack of reporting and victim support was not only of benefit to the students but also to the minority communities from which I am a part of.

Lakeisha said: “Hearing the voices of young individuals with disabilities in regards to hate crime reminded me of the importance of the aims and purposes of the Youth Commission, which I am extremely proud to be a part of.

“As a young woman of African descent, I can personally relate to issues concerning hate crime and its social impacts.

Mageed continued: “I started the session by asking the students if they knew what hate crime was. At first they were very nervous and only one student put his hand up. He said ‘it’s when someone doesn’t like you because of something different about you’.

“The students then formed groups and were asked to create a vertical list of the different types of hate crime starting with what they perceived to be the most harmful and ending with what they believed to be the least harmful. One group chose to make a horizontal list. When I asked why, they said, ‘every one of these has the potential of growing into something really bad…..each one is as important as the other, as something which starts small can grow and get bigger and bigger and could end up with someone killing himself and we see them all as bad’.

“Interestingly, most students when asked who they would tell if they were targeted by hate crime, said they would speak to a policeman.”

Lydia Leonard, Youth Worker and Learning Mentor at Sussex Coast College Hastings, said: “We were really pleased with the interactive workshop. It was great that the SYC and Sergeant Allan had adapted it to the needs of the students which resulted in much discussion amongst them. It was evident that many of them enjoyed learning more about what constitutes a hate crime, what help is out there and what they can do if they are targeted in this way. It was a really positive day and we look forward to having the SYC back again.

“Some of feedback I gathered from students at the workshop included:
‘It was interesting. I think its good they are going to different places talking about hate crime.’
‘I learnt about hate crime. It was inspiring.’
‘The session was good fun. I learnt the difference between ‘crime’ and ‘hate crime.’
‘The people running the session were nice and really friendly.’”

Commenting on his input at the workshop, Sergeant Peter Allan said: “I was really pleased to have been invited to assist the SYC with their Big Conversation in Hastings.

“Hate crime and the types of incident that can fall within its scope are often misunderstood because of the language used by the police and other criminal justice partners. Hate and hostility are strong words and people often do not know at what level the incident has to be before they can report it.

“It was really good to be able to discuss hate crime with a group of young people who are living with a disability of one kind or another. Disability hate crime is a particular challenge for the police and the session was designed to allow the young people to put forward their ideas for solutions.

“I look forward to supporting the SYC with this key area of crime and disorder, especially as it was chosen by them. I am also keen to learn the conclusions of their work.”

Mageed concluded: “The session itself was very insightful and positive. I learnt that not everyone has the same ideas about what can constitute hate crime. I believe the students were able to grasp the real problems at the centre of hate crime and participated in a discussion about what hate crime means to them.

Sussex Youth Commission (SYC) members Lakeisha Kayoka, 21, and Mageed Gharib, 22, were joined by Peter Allan, Hate Crime Sergeant for Sussex Police at Sussex Coast College Hastings, for an interactive workshop on hate crime.

The event was part of the Police & Crime Commissioner’s Youth Commission’s Sussex-wide consultation called the ‘Big Conversation’. Around 20 students and several members of staff got involved and were forthcoming about their own distressing experiences of hate crime.

Youth Commission member, Mageed, said: “As a Muslim living in Brighton I have personally witnessed and experienced hate crime on a daily basis. I feel that this is especially bad due to Brighton’s great diversity of religions, cultures, and sexual orientations. Being able to hold a workshop to address some of the issues around lack of reporting and victim support was not only of benefit to the students but also to the minority communities from which I am a part of.

Lakeisha said: “Hearing the voices of young individuals with disabilities in regards to hate crime reminded me of the importance of the aims and purposes of the Youth Commission, which I am extremely proud to be a part of.

“As a young woman of African descent, I can personally relate to issues concerning hate crime and its social impacts.

Mageed continued: “I started the session by asking the students if they knew what hate crime was. At first they were very nervous and only one student put his hand up. He said ‘it’s when someone doesn’t like you because of something different about you’.

“The students then formed groups and were asked to create a vertical list of the different types of hate crime starting with what they perceived to be the most harmful and ending with what they believed to be the least harmful. One group chose to make a horizontal list. When I asked why, they said, ‘every one of these has the potential of growing into something really bad…..each one is as important as the other, as something which starts small can grow and get bigger and bigger and could end up with someone killing himself and we see them all as bad’.

“Interestingly, most students when asked who they would tell if they were targeted by hate crime, said they would speak to a policeman.”

Lydia Leonard, Youth Worker and Learning Mentor at Sussex Coast College Hastings, said: “We were really pleased with the interactive workshop. It was great that the SYC and Sergeant Allan had adapted it to the needs of the students which resulted in much discussion amongst them. It was evident that many of them enjoyed learning more about what constitutes a hate crime, what help is out there and what they can do if they are targeted in this way. It was a really positive day and we look forward to having the SYC back again.

“Some of feedback I gathered from students at the workshop included:
‘It was interesting. I think its good they are going to different places talking about hate crime.’
‘I learnt about hate crime. It was inspiring.’
‘The session was good fun. I learnt the difference between ‘crime’ and ‘hate crime.’
‘The people running the session were nice and really friendly.’”

Commenting on his input at the workshop, Sergeant Peter Allan said: “I was really pleased to have been invited to assist the SYC with their Big Conversation in Hastings.

“Hate crime and the types of incident that can fall within its scope are often misunderstood because of the language used by the police and other criminal justice partners. Hate and hostility are strong words and people often do not know at what level the incident has to be before they can report it.

“It was really good to be able to discuss hate crime with a group of young people who are living with a disability of one kind or another. Disability hate crime is a particular challenge for the police and the session was designed to allow the young people to put forward their ideas for solutions.

“I look forward to supporting the SYC with this key area of crime and disorder, especially as it was chosen by them. I am also keen to learn the conclusions of their work.”

Mageed concluded: “The session itself was very insightful and positive. I learnt that not everyone has the same ideas about what can constitute hate crime. I believe the students were able to grasp the real problems at the centre of hate crime and participated in a discussion about what hate crime means to them.”

- See more at: http://www.sussex-pcc.gov.uk/news/students-with-disabilities-speak-to-the-youth-commission-about-hate-crime/#sthash.mEcNSFte.dpuf

Sussex Youth Commission (SYC) members Lakeisha Kayoka, 21, and Mageed Gharib, 22, were joined by Peter Allan, Hate Crime Sergeant for Sussex Police at Sussex Coast College Hastings, for an interactive workshop on hate crime.

The event was part of the Police & Crime Commissioner’s Youth Commission’s Sussex-wide consultation called the ‘Big Conversation’. Around 20 students and several members of staff got involved and were forthcoming about their own distressing experiences of hate crime.

Youth Commission member, Mageed, said: “As a Muslim living in Brighton I have personally witnessed and experienced hate crime on a daily basis. I feel that this is especially bad due to Brighton’s great diversity of religions, cultures, and sexual orientations. Being able to hold a workshop to address some of the issues around lack of reporting and victim support was not only of benefit to the students but also to the minority communities from which I am a part of.

Lakeisha said: “Hearing the voices of young individuals with disabilities in regards to hate crime reminded me of the importance of the aims and purposes of the Youth Commission, which I am extremely proud to be a part of.

“As a young woman of African descent, I can personally relate to issues concerning hate crime and its social impacts.

Mageed continued: “I started the session by asking the students if they knew what hate crime was. At first they were very nervous and only one student put his hand up. He said ‘it’s when someone doesn’t like you because of something different about you’.

“The students then formed groups and were asked to create a vertical list of the different types of hate crime starting with what they perceived to be the most harmful and ending with what they believed to be the least harmful. One group chose to make a horizontal list. When I asked why, they said, ‘every one of these has the potential of growing into something really bad…..each one is as important as the other, as something which starts small can grow and get bigger and bigger and could end up with someone killing himself and we see them all as bad’.

“Interestingly, most students when asked who they would tell if they were targeted by hate crime, said they would speak to a policeman.”

Lydia Leonard, Youth Worker and Learning Mentor at Sussex Coast College Hastings, said: “We were really pleased with the interactive workshop. It was great that the SYC and Sergeant Allan had adapted it to the needs of the students which resulted in much discussion amongst them. It was evident that many of them enjoyed learning more about what constitutes a hate crime, what help is out there and what they can do if they are targeted in this way. It was a really positive day and we look forward to having the SYC back again.

“Some of feedback I gathered from students at the workshop included:
‘It was interesting. I think its good they are going to different places talking about hate crime.’
‘I learnt about hate crime. It was inspiring.’
‘The session was good fun. I learnt the difference between ‘crime’ and ‘hate crime.’
‘The people running the session were nice and really friendly.’”

Commenting on his input at the workshop, Sergeant Peter Allan said: “I was really pleased to have been invited to assist the SYC with their Big Conversation in Hastings.

“Hate crime and the types of incident that can fall within its scope are often misunderstood because of the language used by the police and other criminal justice partners. Hate and hostility are strong words and people often do not know at what level the incident has to be before they can report it.

“It was really good to be able to discuss hate crime with a group of young people who are living with a disability of one kind or another. Disability hate crime is a particular challenge for the police and the session was designed to allow the young people to put forward their ideas for solutions.

“I look forward to supporting the SYC with this key area of crime and disorder, especially as it was chosen by them. I am also keen to learn the conclusions of their work.”

Mageed concluded: “The session itself was very insightful and positive. I learnt that not everyone has the same ideas about what can constitute hate crime. I believe the students were able to grasp the real problems at the centre of hate crime and participated in a discussion about what hate crime means to them.”

- See more at: http://www.sussex-pcc.gov.uk/news/students-with-disabilities-speak-to-the-youth-commission-about-hate-crime/#sthash.mEcNSFte.dpuf

Sussex Youth Commission (SYC) members Lakeisha Kayoka, 21, and Mageed Gharib, 22, were joined by Peter Allan, Hate Crime Sergeant for Sussex Police at Sussex Coast College Hastings, for an interactive workshop on hate crime.

The event was part of the Police & Crime Commissioner’s Youth Commission’s Sussex-wide consultation called the ‘Big Conversation’. Around 20 students and several members of staff got involved and were forthcoming about their own distressing experiences of hate crime.

Youth Commission member, Mageed, said: “As a Muslim living in Brighton I have personally witnessed and experienced hate crime on a daily basis. I feel that this is especially bad due to Brighton’s great diversity of religions, cultures, and sexual orientations. Being able to hold a workshop to address some of the issues around lack of reporting and victim support was not only of benefit to the students but also to the minority communities from which I am a part of.

Lakeisha said: “Hearing the voices of young individuals with disabilities in regards to hate crime reminded me of the importance of the aims and purposes of the Youth Commission, which I am extremely proud to be a part of.

“As a young woman of African descent, I can personally relate to issues concerning hate crime and its social impacts.

Mageed continued: “I started the session by asking the students if they knew what hate crime was. At first they were very nervous and only one student put his hand up. He said ‘it’s when someone doesn’t like you because of something different about you’.

“The students then formed groups and were asked to create a vertical list of the different types of hate crime starting with what they perceived to be the most harmful and ending with what they believed to be the least harmful. One group chose to make a horizontal list. When I asked why, they said, ‘every one of these has the potential of growing into something really bad…..each one is as important as the other, as something which starts small can grow and get bigger and bigger and could end up with someone killing himself and we see them all as bad’.

“Interestingly, most students when asked who they would tell if they were targeted by hate crime, said they would speak to a policeman.”

Lydia Leonard, Youth Worker and Learning Mentor at Sussex Coast College Hastings, said: “We were really pleased with the interactive workshop. It was great that the SYC and Sergeant Allan had adapted it to the needs of the students which resulted in much discussion amongst them. It was evident that many of them enjoyed learning more about what constitutes a hate crime, what help is out there and what they can do if they are targeted in this way. It was a really positive day and we look forward to having the SYC back again.

“Some of feedback I gathered from students at the workshop included:
‘It was interesting. I think its good they are going to different places talking about hate crime.’
‘I learnt about hate crime. It was inspiring.’
‘The session was good fun. I learnt the difference between ‘crime’ and ‘hate crime.’
‘The people running the session were nice and really friendly.’”

Commenting on his input at the workshop, Sergeant Peter Allan said: “I was really pleased to have been invited to assist the SYC with their Big Conversation in Hastings.

“Hate crime and the types of incident that can fall within its scope are often misunderstood because of the language used by the police and other criminal justice partners. Hate and hostility are strong words and people often do not know at what level the incident has to be before they can report it.

“It was really good to be able to discuss hate crime with a group of young people who are living with a disability of one kind or another. Disability hate crime is a particular challenge for the police and the session was designed to allow the young people to put forward their ideas for solutions.

“I look forward to supporting the SYC with this key area of crime and disorder, especially as it was chosen by them. I am also keen to learn the conclusions of their work.”

Mageed concluded: “The session itself was very insightful and positive. I learnt that not everyone has the same ideas about what can constitute hate crime. I believe the students were able to grasp the real problems at the centre of hate crime and participated in a discussion about what hate crime means to them.”

- See more at: http://www.sussex-pcc.gov.uk/news/students-with-disabilities-speak-to-the-youth-commission-about-hate-crime/#sthash.mEcNSFte.dpuf

Sussex Youth Commission (SYC) members Lakeisha Kayoka, 21, and Mageed Gharib, 22, were joined by Peter Allan, Hate Crime Sergeant for Sussex Police at Sussex Coast College Hastings, for an interactive workshop on hate crime.

The event was part of the Police & Crime Commissioner’s Youth Commission’s Sussex-wide consultation called the ‘Big Conversation’. Around 20 students and several members of staff got involved and were forthcoming about their own distressing experiences of hate crime.

Youth Commission member, Mageed, said: “As a Muslim living in Brighton I have personally witnessed and experienced hate crime on a daily basis. I feel that this is especially bad due to Brighton’s great diversity of religions, cultures, and sexual orientations. Being able to hold a workshop to address some of the issues around lack of reporting and victim support was not only of benefit to the students but also to the minority communities from which I am a part of.

Lakeisha said: “Hearing the voices of young individuals with disabilities in regards to hate crime reminded me of the importance of the aims and purposes of the Youth Commission, which I am extremely proud to be a part of.

“As a young woman of African descent, I can personally relate to issues concerning hate crime and its social impacts.

Mageed continued: “I started the session by asking the students if they knew what hate crime was. At first they were very nervous and only one student put his hand up. He said ‘it’s when someone doesn’t like you because of something different about you’.

“The students then formed groups and were asked to create a vertical list of the different types of hate crime starting with what they perceived to be the most harmful and ending with what they believed to be the least harmful. One group chose to make a horizontal list. When I asked why, they said, ‘every one of these has the potential of growing into something really bad…..each one is as important as the other, as something which starts small can grow and get bigger and bigger and could end up with someone killing himself and we see them all as bad’.

“Interestingly, most students when asked who they would tell if they were targeted by hate crime, said they would speak to a policeman.”

Lydia Leonard, Youth Worker and Learning Mentor at Sussex Coast College Hastings, said: “We were really pleased with the interactive workshop. It was great that the SYC and Sergeant Allan had adapted it to the needs of the students which resulted in much discussion amongst them. It was evident that many of them enjoyed learning more about what constitutes a hate crime, what help is out there and what they can do if they are targeted in this way. It was a really positive day and we look forward to having the SYC back again.

“Some of feedback I gathered from students at the workshop included:
‘It was interesting. I think its good they are going to different places talking about hate crime.’
‘I learnt about hate crime. It was inspiring.’
‘The session was good fun. I learnt the difference between ‘crime’ and ‘hate crime.’
‘The people running the session were nice and really friendly.’”

Commenting on his input at the workshop, Sergeant Peter Allan said: “I was really pleased to have been invited to assist the SYC with their Big Conversation in Hastings.

“Hate crime and the types of incident that can fall within its scope are often misunderstood because of the language used by the police and other criminal justice partners. Hate and hostility are strong words and people often do not know at what level the incident has to be before they can report it.

“It was really good to be able to discuss hate crime with a group of young people who are living with a disability of one kind or another. Disability hate crime is a particular challenge for the police and the session was designed to allow the young people to put forward their ideas for solutions.

“I look forward to supporting the SYC with this key area of crime and disorder, especially as it was chosen by them. I am also keen to learn the conclusions of their work.”

Mageed concluded: “The session itself was very insightful and positive. I learnt that not everyone has the same ideas about what can constitute hate crime. I believe the students were able to grasp the real problems at the centre of hate crime and participated in a discussion about what hate crime means to them.”

- See more at: http://www.sussex-pcc.gov.uk/news/students-with-disabilities-speak-to-the-youth-commission-about-hate-crime/#sthash.mEcNSFte.dpuf

E-News Signup

fb-like
 
popup
×